Browse all

Year: 2015

18 Dec 2015

Kestrel inspires unpowered, autonomous glider to climb higher

Researchers at the RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia have drawn inspiration from the way kestrels hover above their prey to develop an autonomous fixed-wing micro air vehicle (MAV) that can gain height from convenient updrafts. The results are published today, Friday 18th December, in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics. “It’s long been known the birds take...

14 Dec 2015

New Senior Product Manager appointed for IOP Publishing

Terry Hulbert has been announced as the new Senior Product Manager, Content Platform for IOP Publishing (IOP). Terry will be responsible for driving the development roadmap for IOPscience, IOP’s content platform. He will be focused on ensuring that the platform and the services it provides meets the needs of IOP’s readers and partners. He will...

11 Dec 2015

Tropical groundwater resources resilient to climate change

Courtesy of the University College London (UCL) Press Office. Tropical groundwater may prove to be a climate-resilient source of freshwater in the tropics as intense rainfall favours the replenishment of these resources, according to a new study published in Environmental Research Letters. As climate observations show that global warming leads to fewer but more intense rainfalls,...

11 Dec 2015

Wearable energy generator uses urine to power wireless transmitter

Courtesy of the University of the West of England Press Office. A pair of socks embedded with miniaturised microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and fuelled with urine pumped by the wearer’s footsteps has powered a wireless transmitter to send a signal to a PC. This is the first self-sufficient system powered by a wearable energy generator...

11 Dec 2015

Using cycling to explain why physics isn’t a drag

Scientists and teachers have combined to develop a simple spreadsheet-based method of teaching aerodynamic drag to 14 and 15 year olds. By measuring the speed of one of their classmates riding a bike, taking a photo to in order to measure the frontal area of the cyclist, the students were able to calculate the drag...

11 Dec 2015

A fishy tale of a sheep in wolf’s clothing

Scientists have developed a technique to perform dietary analysis of fish by analysing microscopic tooth wear. The process, which involves taking moulds of the teeth similar to those a dentist might take, used focus variation microscopy to digitally capture details of the tooth surfaces, zooming in to an area just 1/7th of a mm in...

11 Dec 2015

Neural stimulation offers treatment for ‘dry eye’

Scientists have developed a device that electronically stimulates tear production, which will offer hope to sufferers of dry eye syndrome, one of the most common eye diseases in the world. The device, 16 mm long, 3-4 mm wide and 1-2 mm thick, was implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland in rabbit eyes. It was activated...

09 Dec 2015

New Editor-in-Chief for New Journal of Physics announced as Barry Sanders

Professor Barry Sanders has been appointed as the new Editor-in-Chief of New Journal of Physics (NJP) and will begin his term in January 2016. Professor Sanders will succeed Professor Eberhard Bodenschatz who has served as Editor-in-Chief of NJP since 2005. Professor Sanders holds positions at institutions in both North America and Asia. He is Director...

27 Nov 2015

Graphene microphone outperforms traditional nickel and offers ultrasonic reach

Scientists have developed a graphene based microphone nearly 32 times more sensitive than microphones of standard nickel-based construction. The researchers, based at the University of Belgrade, Serbia, created a vibrating membrane – the part of a condenser microphone which converts the sound to a current – from graphene, and were able to show up to...

25 Nov 2015

Exploring the physics of a chocolate fountain

A University College London (UCL) mathematics student has worked out the secrets of how chocolate behaves in a chocolate fountain, answering the age-old question of why the falling ‘curtain’ of chocolate surprisingly pulls inwards rather than going straight downwards. The results are published today, 25th November 2015, in European Journal of Physics. “Chocolate fountains are...